HOW DID YOU DISCOVER REGGAE MUSIC?
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jahdid
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« on: May 22, 2009, 12:40:55 pm »

For this music we all love there was THE DAY of contact. How it comes?  

My First contact
My Dad was a music lovers he will buy dozens of vynils those days, from salsa to soul and african music. One day in 1975  he brought fresh albums at home. I used to listen to all one by one. When i got to the Album Natty Dread of Bob Marley and listen to it i knew that something was different from the others music. I felt in love in total love. Didn't know about rasta, about the words, about the philosophy, about ganja, nothing just that rythm doing like this "CHINK CHINK CHINK CHINK CHINK"  34 years later i am still mad of it. JAH BLESS



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« Last Edit: October 12, 2009, 02:59:49 pm by jahdid »
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Don420
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2009, 07:26:53 pm »

          had heard about reggae music but was never played in my area and 
 was also in about 1975 a friend bought a Bob Marley album just because of the cover
         i was hooked right then and never looked back  ras_rastaleafs
 
                         ras_lol  my friend never got the vibe and sold the record
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king jamma
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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2009, 07:33:11 pm »

A local reggae act local to our town combined with hanging out at a reggae joint formerly owned in the 1950s by my family... I was underage but owners would always allow me in knowing I didn't wish to drink alcohol but wanted to watch and hear performers there.
I think the first for me was ub40 and BMarley... leading to Third World and Steel Pulse.
It opened from there a big big world with conscious sound, right about the time I became for a few reasons disenchanted with the Catholic church, and stopped going to mass every sunday, reggae became a many time daily instead of a once per week source of spiritual guidance, which was more real, more humble, more actual than organized Roman catholic churches, without the history of pain and death, with real living role models, which I was then and am still greatly in  need of, a true force for change and progress.
Very happy to have reggae inna mi life.
Every day it teaches me something new, leads me down a path of good with a positive push I greatly need more and more each day, as it seems sometimes that the further along life goes, the easier sometimes it feels to get stuck in your tracks, and tempted with the negative, reggae inspires one with that idea that living as a hypocrite is no good, encourages forgiveness for the past as long as one is actively changing themselves to be a better person with a better mindset.
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jahdid
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« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2009, 09:32:48 pm »

A local reggae act local to our town combined with hanging out at a reggae joint formerly owned in the 1950s by my family... I was underage but owners would always allow me in knowing I didn't wish to drink alcohol but wanted to watch and hear performers there.
I think the first for me was ub40 and BMarley... leading to Third World and Steel Pulse.
It opened from there a big big world with conscious sound, right about the time I became for a few reasons disenchanted with the Catholic church, and stopped going to mass every sunday, reggae became a many time daily instead of a once per week source of spiritual guidance, which was more real, more humble, more actual than organized Roman catholic churches, without the history of pain and death, with real living role models, which I was then and am still greatly in  need of, a true force for change and progress.
Very happy to have reggae inna mi life.
Every day it teaches me something new, leads me down a path of good with a positive push I greatly need more and more each day, as it seems sometimes that the further along life goes, the easier sometimes it feels to get stuck in your tracks, and tempted with the negative, reggae inspires one with that idea that living as a hypocrite is no good, encourages forgiveness for the past as long as one is actively changing themselves to be a better person with a better mindset.

Mi Just love that story man, just love that. Reggae our religion
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Dirty Reggae
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2009, 03:09:20 pm »

Also through a friend,had collection of Bob,Gregory Isaacs,Lucky Dube,Alpha Blondy ,got myself copies been hooked ever since.
His musical taste has changed over the years,still give thanks to him
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jahdid
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2009, 12:12:41 am »

I listened to soul music on the radio in the '60s and '70s... some of the songs had a little reggae riddim, even Paul Simon had "Mother and Child Reunion" with the great reggae beat. I loved this stuff but did not make the island connection until the mid-70s when I borrowed a copy of Rastaman Vibration from the local library. I got it home and opened the fold-out cover to reveal a pile of seeds.   smoke_spliff  Once I heard Augustus Pablo I became a collector of dub, too.

Yes I Milton " Rastaman Vibration" was a turnpoint for me too ras_wink. From that album i started to overstand all the meaning of Reggae and Rastafari. Before it was just the music.
 
Jah Love
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« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2009, 01:58:40 am »

for me i was about 14 and was at a house that had a few reggae vinyl i was looking through  them ....only heard about bob at that time....  and picked up the best of gregory isaacs was drawn to the cover and had to have a listen and was hooked right there and then and never looked back since .that album still  in my top ten now after nearly thirty years ,speciall guest still takes me back to that day.... Smiley
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 12:01:06 am by dno »
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tobijafa
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« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2009, 01:30:31 am »

I to had an uncle who was into the ska,reggae and punk sounds that were big in the real areas of London in the late 70's.
My dad had got me into Marley before but I was turned on  by the greensleves album samplers and disco 45s of Half Pint and other artists my uncle was buyng.  By 14 yrs me and a mate Uhuru used to sneak into local blues to bag a draw and hang out (untill usaly we were kicked out) - Pato banton, smiley culture, Aswad etc for us at gigs.  Still got the vynils i nicked off my uncle! naughty but they still get played out in the dance.   Thanks to the teachers and bringers of tunes into this world- I keep spreading it to this day and always buzz when a young cat comes up and says "whats this - i love it"
Forward ever backward never
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ras_tim
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« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2009, 01:37:17 pm »

My first experience was a 3 cd cd box of bob marley in his Lee Perry years that was after a cousin would always listen to it and I asked for xmass that 3 cd box loved shortly all my money went to that!!
Now 17 years later and 300 cd s and 100 lp s further I still love it!!
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dno
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2009, 10:44:42 pm »

all these stories a little different but they all  agree on hear it ..  love it... hooked on it... Grin  reggae the best music around long live the reggae beat
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2009, 07:47:01 pm »

Started to listen Reggae at the age of 16 it's started at a home dealers house this man was reggae talk and sleep reggae
That was the cornerstone of something nice he give me a collection tape of reggae to see what i like
It's started with Marley,Steel Pulse ,Black Uhuru and slowly i started to buy other artist copy tapes from friends
And now 18 years further i even like it more and it probably never stops
I like the people faces when you only listen reggae in my car from work i have no radio only a cd player and always reggae
Some of the guys that have to drive with  can't stand it than it's time to play it a little louder
just as long till they ask me who is that can i have a copy  Cheesy
Reggae Music run things !!!!!
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But this Revelation time just like the bible tell you.I'm only speaking what is already written.Everyone just think that Reggae music is just Reggae and people say this and that about Reggae music but people don't really understand the full power of what is behind Reggae Music !
Don Julian
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2009, 04:35:01 pm »

Very interesting replies, it seems people come from all different paths unto the Reggae.

Reggae was one of the many sounds I heard growing up.
My mother had lp's by Bob Marley, Jimmy Clff, Toots & The Maytals, Third World and Peter Tosh.
My aunts and my cousins had other artists such as Dillinger, Inner Circle and Black Slate.
The earliest reggae songs I remember are the Twinkle Stars cover of Singerman,
Desmond Dekkers Israelites, the cover of Black & White by Greyhound and other Trojan stalwarts.
Then came the Two-tone movement and dutch band Doe Maar with their ska flavoured sounds.

It wasn't until the early 1980s that I started to listen almost exclusively to Reggae, actually encouraged by my then best friend who introduced me to Aswad. (Thru-out the 80's we influenced each other in trying out more and more reggae artists). Another friend lend me the first Gregory and Dennis lp's I ever heard (Lonely Lover, Night Nurse and Prophet Rides Again).

I remember taking my boombox to school and playing it during recess, and later even during English class. Peter Tosh Equal Rights (his best lp imo) LKJ Forces Of Victory (Sonny's Lettah still sounds awesome to me) LKJ In Dub (the first dub lp I bought which I could actually get into at the time) Yellowmans Nobody Move, Black Uhurus Brutal, all boomed across the classroom or the schoolyard, to the annoyance of my pop loving co-students. (Mainly the girls I have to say, it seemed to me as if they only liked a reggae song when it charted in the top 40 Grin)

Other classmates and friends introduced me to albums from Steel Pulse, Linval Thompson, Junior Reid, Eek-a-mouse (who was so popular at the time that almost all of my schoolmates had the same Skidip tape, man was that annoying!
beng didy beng ming woo didy boy wee yo i, everywhere i came. Causing me to 'boycott' him until the late 80's when his popularity had receded some Grin)

In '85 I came across African Reggae: Alpha Blondy Apartheid is Nazism and in '87 Lee Perry/Dub Syndicate Time Boom X De Devil Dead. Around '88 Trojan Records hired the great Steven Barrow to compile a slew of lp's highlighting the different producers and reggae styles from the late 60's early 70's. That completely sealed it. I learned to appreciate almost any Reggae style from Ska onward to Digital/Dancehall. I stopped a long time ago with listening to Reggae exclusively, my music taste is eclectic, but it's still my favourite.

Anyway, It seems to me that there must be some more Idrin in the massive who must have grown up with reggae maybe even exclusively, beside me. I would love to hear some of their stories.

Peace,
DJ
« Last Edit: April 22, 2021, 11:38:31 am by Don Julian »
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Don420
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2009, 08:19:37 pm »

Anyway, It seems to me that there must be some more Idrin in the massive who must have grown up with reggae maybe even exclusively, beside me. I would love to hear some of their stories.

 all my kids all grew up exclusively with reggae music being played as they were born and being exposed to local reggae bands practising in their homes, being dragged to many a festival and dances of a lot of international bands  Cheesy
only the oldest reggae stayed with reggae and checks out any live shows ...  the others all consider it good music but more classical  Cheesy
 had to  smile checking out my 4 year old grandson singing along to Get Up Stand Up as he was playing with his action figures - thought the lyrics went along with his game

 ras_jahlive
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Don Julian
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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2009, 08:23:16 pm »

had to  smile checking out my 4 year old grandson singing along to Get Up Stand Up as he was playing with his action figures - thought the lyrics went along with his game

 ras_jahlive

AW, Raine that is so sweet!
Makes me smile Smiley
Thanks for sharing this.

Peace,
DJ
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boombasticonetwo
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« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2012, 05:06:25 pm »

Hah thats easy
It came on me path
and it neva left zeeen  Grin

Loving the Conscious Rootical Vibez as they beat in i heart & soul 
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